The Extra Key

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I am excited to say I finally completed The Extra Key by Kevin Polman. I started it shortly before my best friend’s wedding in March and it got put on the back burner, unfortunately. Considering the overall plot and ending of the story I think it would have been timelier to have completed it before her wedding. Live and learn.

I was excited to purchase this book at one of the author’s readings in the Summer of 2016. Full disclosure, Kevin Polman was one of my high school teachers. He taught Chemistry and my A&P class. He was a great teacher and I learned a lot. I will admit he intimidated me a bit, but that’s not a bad thing. I felt like he challenged me to be a better and more independent student.

Now for the part y’all actually care about: the ramble review. The Extra Key is a slice of life story about a man, Corey, who loses his wife in a terrible car accident. Corey wallows in depression for a while, but then discovers letters from his late wife. In those letters she encourages him to move on. A shy man wary of doing anything outside his comfort zone, he is also greeted by little “talking” dogs that help him on his journey to recovery. Throughout his recovery he touches on various issues that many of us deal with: death, work environments, weight gain/loss, and low self-esteem. Through the protagonist tackling each problem, the audience may also feel compelled to reflect on their own problems and evaluate how they are handling each issue they come across.

I loved the prologue to this novel. In a letter from a woman named Sarah, she reminds Corey of the importance of having an extra key or the importance of asking others for help when it gets to be too much. “…many would rather jump off the ledge than ask for help. In the same way that humans are ashamed to admit that they might need an extra key for their car because it implies that they are capable of making a mistake, they might also be ashamed to admit that they need to have on hand the loving care and advice of other people to deal with certain types of problems. Unfortunately, the love key is the one extra key that humans have the most trouble asking for, acquiring, and using, even when it is fully accessible.” (p. 7). I related a longer quote than I normally would, however, that whole segment seems to perfectly sum up the theme and tone of the novel. Corey, as one who has lost his whole world, needs to remember how to love again. It is necessary for him to rely on others who love him and want what is best for him. There are many times when he expresses being alone or lonely, but the author clearly illustrates that there are people around him who are willing to be there for Corey at a moment’s notice. He is never completely alone.

Overall, it was a solid book and story and I highly recommend reading Kevin Polman’s first published novel. He has a collection of short stories and an illustrated book available for purchase as well, but I have not had an opportunity to check those out yet. For the 26 book 2017 Reading Challenge, which seems less likely I will complete (unless I don’t worry about the categories and count all the hundreds of comic books I’ll read), I will make this my “Book published in the last year” check box, since my copy was published June 14, 2016. Feel free to check out Kevin Polman‘s blog on WordPress too! Personally, I enjoy his updates.