Rocket

Rocket Comic

Cover of Rocket, Issue 1 (2017)

After going to see Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 this week, I was inspired to check out the new solo series of Rocket Raccoon! This series, Rocket, is written by Al Ewing and drawn by Adam Gorham. Rocket appears on his own after he messes up something big on Earth, or at least that is the brief explanation we receive. While he’s at a bar his old girlfriend appears. She begs him for help and he warily accepts. Rocket gathers a team together to pull off an enormous, impossible heist. We have to wait till issue two to get the conclusion of it. I’m not complaining, as it was a well timed cliffhanger. I enjoy how the story jumps right into the action, setting up just enough to get an understanding of the planet he’s on and who Rocket is as a character.

I picked up this new series mostly because I was impressed with Rocket’s character in the Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 movie. Rocket had much more screen time and they developed his character on a much deeper level than the first movie. After the first Guardians movie, I had already fallen in love with Groot (I absolutely adore him as Baby Groot in the second film), but Rocket seemed plain and uninteresting. After getting more history behind his character, I thought, “A rocket comic might actually be fun.” I was not disappointed with this first issue and plan to continue collecting this series. Apparently the first story arc will be 5 issues long. I think it will pair nicely with the Baby Groot series that I will be collecting in late May. I will not be getting Guardians of the Galaxy comics of them as a team with Star Lord, Gamora, and Drax though. I have found after the many times I have tried to collect team comics, I just can’t get into them on a month to month basis. I find the comics that focus on a single character much more interesting and fun to read. That doesn’t mean I don’t like team-ups, I just don’t seem to like comics that focus on an entire team. For example, I picked up X-Men Gold and Champions recently.  While I like the ideas behind the stories, I seem to want more of specific characters rather than the whole team. Those might be series I’d pick up from a public library to read in the future.

Rocket is a heist comic that is hilarious and fun. It is not meant to be taken seriously, but rather as a comedy with some oddball protagonists. Oddballs tend to be my favorite.

A Land Called Tarot

I began this blog one year ago! While I may not have been as consistent as I had hoped, I am still proud that I have at least maintained it! I hope you enjoy my coming reviews and writings!

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Cover (first published February 2017)

 

A Land Called Tarot by Gael Bertrand

Can you really read a book with no words? I think you can, if the illustrations are done well enough demonstrate the overall theme and plot and characters of the story. To illustrate my point, A Land Called Tarot is a fantasy story told in a comic book format with no dialogue. There are a few fantasy language words between segments and there are roman numerals that correspond with tarot cards. If I had been more familiar with the names of the cards and their association with the roman numerals, I would have had a better understanding about where the story was headed as the numbers were presented. For example, the first roman numeral given is XVI. This is 16, which is named The Tower. The hero travels to [spoiler] a tower! While I am glad I did not bother trying to interrupt the flow of my reading to connect the roman numerals to a name that would show me where our hero was headed, it will be fun to re-read with this knowledge in stow and piece the story together a bit more clearly.

I really enjoyed the flow of the plot. I will admit there were times I was a bit confused as to what was happening, but I came up with my own explanation and moved on. A story with no words requires the reader to develop their own understanding of the plot along with the artist. One of the reasons I purchased this book was because I thought I may be able to read it in a different way each time. I was correct. While I may understand more about the author’s intent as I study the roman numerals, nothing is stopping me from creating a narrative with the pictures in my own way—like reading a picture book to a child and ignoring the text the author provides.

After completing part one, my first thought was that I was reading video game cut scenes. I enjoy watching my fiancé and my former college roommate play video games. A Land Called Tarot seemed to have a similar pacing. Each quest seemed contained, yet connected. This is a positive thing, as I feel it allows for the wordless story to be a little better understood.

I would recommend taking a look at this graphic novel and really delving into the pictures. It is definitely worth seeing how good illustrations do not require text to tell a beautiful story. I am excited to know that an author/illustrator has successfully developed a story without the use of dialogue or words in general. It really demonstrates the power of visual art.

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XVI (photo credit: Bertrand, A Land called Tarot)

Scarlet Spider

By Chris Yost

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Consider this. First, you are a clone. Second, you are a failed experiment. Kaine lives with both realities. Kaine used to be an assassin and a supervillain to Peter Parker Spider-Man. The first volume was a tad confusing until the end of the volume where I read a bit about the history between Peter Parker, Ben Reilly, and Kaine. I could have done research beforehand, but I didn’t want to spoil any of the story. I also know my fiancé has told me the story of Kaine’s past, but I couldn’t remember all the little details.

In the first volume Kaine wants to move to Mexico and chill on the beach with a drink. However, he only makes it to Houston before he reluctantly helps saves a girl who is being smuggled across the border. After saving her from near death, he takes her in to keep her from being deported. Aracely can read people’s minds and can connect with other’s emotions, even evoking a sense of fear from her opponents. She eventually takes on the superhero identity of Hummingbird during a mission she goes on with the Scarlet Spider. Despite his best efforts to remain a loner, Kaine develops friendships with a cop and doctor couple, Officer Wally Layton and Dr. Donald Meland, and a woman at the hotel, Annabelle. He befriends them all fairly naturally, considering his constant inner dialog of being a monster and wanting to be alone.

Kaine confronts this monster inside him in volume 2, when he nearly dies from an attack by a Wolf gang who are after Aracely. This scene seemed to be a defining moment in Kaine’s acceptance of himself. He is trying to be a new man in a new city trying to get away from all his evil deeds of the past. However, the monster is still inside of him and it will always be. Accepting that came at a price, but he was not without another savior. One thing that makes this series great is Yost’s way of maintaining Kaine’s constant struggle between good and evil. He never seems to become fully evil, yet at the same time, he can’t feel truly good.

I enjoyed many aspects of this series. I loved the fact it took place in Houston, Texas. Texas is a fantastic state (I am biased). I was amused that they included a rodeo issue in the series to allow for some “traditional” Texas elements. I was also pleased to see that Houston accepted their new superhero with open arms. They praised him and indicated they were happy he was there to be their personal superhero. Their acceptance was probably one of the reasons that Kaine found a home among these Houstonians. I also enjoyed seeing the Rangers featured for a few issues in volume 2. The Rangers are a team of superheroes (like the Avengers) that help out areas located in the Southwest United States.

Scarlet Spider is my “a book you can finish in a day” book/series for the 26 book 2017 reading challenge. I knew I wanted to do a comic for that category, but it would be too easy to just read a single graphic novel, so I decided to read a short series. This comic is 25 issues with a one issue special (12.1) for a total of 26 issues in four trade paperback editions. I completed them all in one day to accomplish the task. This series is one my fiancé has been trying to get me to read for over a year now. I am glad I finally got around to reading it! It was well worth it.

After Death

A.D. After Death, Book One 

What would happen if there was no more death?

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A genetic cure for death has been found in this new 3 part series by Scott Snyder and Jeff Lemire. However, one man is beginning to feel the repercussions of death and question his place in a world where they are no longer mortal. This comic book reads like a mixture of a traditional comic book and a picture book. The present day story is done in the format of a paneled comic book, but the pages containing flashbacks are designed with long text accompanied by simple and gorgeous water color illustrations. This format allows the reader to clearly understand the author’s intent for that scene.

After death’s cure, it seems people operate in fifty year cycles. The lead character, Jonah, takes on a new job for the new cycle. It is almost as if humans realize they need to make a change every fifty years or they’ll get bored or go crazy. I am not positive that was Snyder’s message, but it makes sense to me, as I enjoy a variety and I am mortal. I cannot imagine, nor would I ever desire, to be immortal on Earth.

Jonah seems to be going through an “eternal mid-life crisis,” in a sense. He reflects on his first memory and memories that he believes defined him, for example he was a bit of a kleptomaniac as a kid. According to him, the whole reason the cure for death was found was because he stole the wrong thing. This “thing” he stole was not revealed in book one, which is the author’s catch for getting you intrigued for book two, I am sure. We do know that Jonah Cooke was a normal, everyday man who discovered, or revealed, the extraordinary. One thing I do like about his character, is that he does not seem to have changed in the future. He is a random, boring guy who still likes to “collect” things that may or may not belong to him.

Overall, I recommend this book, but reserve any final thoughts for future volumes. The story can go in so many directions that  I don’t feel I can give a proper review until the story is complete. However, it is intriguing and I write this ramble in hope others pick up this series too and enjoy it along with me.

Note: book two came out this week at your local comic shop! I have not read it yet.

Hiatus and SLAM!

Hello readers! (if I still have any following my hiatus…)

After participating in National Novel Writing Month last month (November), I realized how much I missed writing my own stories. I had a lot of fun drafting a novelette and a few short stories. Many of which will never see publication. I hope to edit a couple of the others.

I am also aware it has been three months since I last posted on my blog. Given the holidays are around the corner, I will not promise regularity, but I do hope to make at least one post a week from here on out. I think two a week was too much for my schedule and I got overwhelmed.

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On to the ramble: My friend at the local comic book shop, Excalibur, recommended I start reading a new independent series titled SLAM! I was skeptical, but since I know a couple people doing Roller Derby I thought I might give it a try. The cover is fun. Bright pink and green. I enjoy her black eye and bloody face. The story progresses fairly well for a first issue, in that it gives each of the main characters’ backstories in a succinct manner and quickly establishes their newfound friendship. After laboring over my own story last month, I remembered how difficult it was to introduce characters clearly and effectively in a limited time frame. A couple of the pages I enjoyed the most were the “P.D. (Pre-Derby)” and “A.D. (After-Derby)” character sketch pages of lead protagonists, Jennifer Chu and Maisie Huff.

The author of SLAM! is Pamela Ribon, who is probably better known as a story writer for the recent Disney film, Moana. If you have not yet seen this new Disney princess film, I highly suggest it. The illustrator is Veronica Fish, who has done a lot of work with the Archie series. Fish does an excellent job with her character designs and the expressions are spot-on.

Happy reading everyone!

Black Widow

Black Widow: The Finely Woven Thread (2014) & Black Widow: The Tightly Tangled Web (2015)

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By Nathan Edmonson. Art by Phil Noto.

I have always known Black Widow as an Avenger. I was first introduced to her through the cartoons as a strong female character that would fight alongside Captain America and the rest of the primarily male team. In 2014, I heard Black Widow would be featured in her own solo series with Edmonson as the writer and Noto as the artist. I finally got around to reading her story. I have completed the first two collected volumes, available from my local library. The story from Black Widow issues 1-12 and Punisher issue 9 was solid. Edmonson showed us who Natasha is as a character, human, and spy. Though the story was good, I think the best part of the books was the artwork.

The art and coloring took me a while to get used to, yet it was quite striking and I eventually fell in love with it. The characters look sketched. The outlines of the characters appear to be almost unfinished with the lines not connecting in almost a randomized fashion, yet it almost seems more natural that way. In addition to the outlining, each panel seems to have been water colored. I don’t know if this is done via the computer or by hand. I assume it is colored through a computer but made to look hand colored with watercolor (if someone knows please let me know in the comments, thanks). As much as I praise the drawings and coloring of these collected comics, I do have a complaint. The dark panels were nearly impossible for me to distinguish the drawings. It is like in a movie where everything goes pitch black except a small outline where the lead character is standing. However, when I moved from the corner couch to the other one more directly under the overhead light, I could see all the details in the dark panels as clear as if it were day. I would say it was my room lighting, but I read comics in the “dark” spot all the time and never have trouble. Therefore, I suggest if you read this book, make sure you are sitting in a place with plenty of overhead light. The art is worth it.

My favorite part of the series is getting to know Natasha’s soft side, primarily though her interactions with a stray cat. This cat is always there waiting for her whenever she returns from her solo or group adventures. Her main problem with adopting the devoted kitty is that she does not want to make a single location home. She claims on one of her missions that home is wherever she is at that moment. She delves deep into her projects and makes sure that the mission is complete to the satisfaction of the client, given that the client isn’t evil. Her constant travels are contrasted by her neighbor lady who is stuck in the same place with an abusive husband. Natasha asks her why she stays. Ana, the neighbor, says it is home. When Natasha returns from her mission, she beats up Ana’s husband and threatens him if he ever lays a hand on Ana again and then tells Ana she should leave anyway. I do not know the conclusion to that story. Though, shortly after, the reader sees that Natasha has formally adopted the kitty, Liho, and she is even having Isaiah, her lawyer and manager, take care of Liho while she is out of town. Apparently, even someone who tries to find a home anywhere, realized she needed a place to return. A place to come back to care for someone—in this case, a cat.

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Pretty Deadly, Vol. 1

By Kelly Sue DeConnick ; Art by Emma Rios

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Death. Death is something that happens to everyone in time. Some survive for years, others do not. In this story, even death has its cycle. Death (personified) can be replaced with a new Death. Through this fairytale-like story, set in the Wild West, we see the impact death has on the world and in people’s lives.

A butterfly and a skeleton rabbit (Bones Bunny) narrate Pretty Deadly. Traditionally, a butterfly symbolizes new life, and in this situation, Bones Bunny represents death. Therefore, personified symbols of new life and death narrate the story of Death replacing Death. Confusing? Yes, I was confused too. However, DeConnick uses these narrators to weave a tale together in pieces, revealing only a little of each character at a time. This method allows me to truly appreciate individual characters as they are gradually revealed and as their past is steadily uncovered.

To introduce the characters generally, Sissy and Fox put on a show for the local villagers for money. They tell the story of Mason and Beauty. Mason takes his love and locks her in a tower to keep her away from other men. She pleads with him, saying she will die if she is locked up. He does not listen. She pleads with Death to take her. Death instead falls in love with her, but eventually grants her request. However, she and Death have a child that Death names Ginny. Ginny becomes a Reaper of Vengeance, “a hunter of men who have sinned.” She is then called Deathface Ginny.

The art is as beautiful as it is gruesome. I love how Rios incorporates the symbolism of the story into her art. Butterflies burst forth from death, water engulfs the living and brings new life, and the desert reveals the lack of life in the world. Life and death go hand in hand. Even when a character dies, he or she is still alive, they are just not “among the living.” Souls seem to live on despite physical death, yet they can eventually be “set free,” as Alice desires throughout the story. Although this tale seems to overtly focus on death, to me it comments more on the beauty and frailty of life.

I checked this book out from my local library and hope to check out volume 2 that comes out in late August 2016! I first discovered DeConnick by reading Captain Marvel and fell in love with her story telling ability. I am looking forward to reading more books by her and can’t wait to see what she comes up with next.